9 comforting books for down days

Some days, weeks (and months!) can feel trickier to wade through than others. If the weather feels a little bit grim, if you’re burnt out, or if life has decided to throw you a few curve balls, then escapism and time-out can really help!   I find (unsurprisingly!) that reading brings me so much comfort. It’s… Continue reading 9 comforting books for down days

Review: The Confession by Jessie Burton

While taking a wintery walk on Hampstead Heath in 1980, Elise Morceau meets the bold, successful writer, Constance (Connie) Holden. Falling in love fast, Elise soon becomes infatuated with this enigmatic, brilliant older woman. She is so drawn to Connie that she follows her to LA, where Connie’s first novel is being made into a major motion picture. But as time goes by, Elise feels increasingly lost and out of her depth. In a catalytic moment of spontaneity, Elise makes a choice that will upend her life as she knew it. Fast forward thirty or so years, Rose Simmons is searching for the mother she doesn’t remember. Raised by her father, Rose’s mother left many years ago without a trace. Now, dissatisfied with so much of her life and relationships, Rose wants to track down her allusive mother. The search takes her to Constance Holden, the last person to see her mother before she disappeared.

5 perfect books for cosy Autumn reading

It’s that time of year when slowly but surely the evenings are drawing in, outside is a little chillier than before, and the leaves are turning that gorgeous burnt orange colour. For book lovers (or, for me at least!), it's the season for curling up with a good book, a blanket, a hot beverage of choice...essentially Autumn is the best excuse to do what I wish I could do all year round! If you’re in need of a little reading inspiration in preparation for the gloriously cosy months ahead (let’s face it, most of us will be spending even more time inside than usual!) then look no further. I’ve scanned my shelves and pulled out a bumper list of books to see you through those darker evenings.

Everything I read in September

And just like that, September has come to an end! I’ve really enjoyed the last four weeks, trying to eke out as much of the summer as possible before the inevitably grey days of October set in.  My trip up to the Northumberland coast gave me a chance to switch off and slowly read through… Continue reading Everything I read in September

Review: Dominicana by Angie Cruz

Dominicana by Angie Cruz tells the story of fifteen year old Ana Canción, a young girl who lives with her family in the Dominican Republic in the mid 1960s. When Juan Ruiz, a man twice her age, proposes and offers to take her with him to New York, Ana’s mother insists she must say yes. Juan is the Canción family’s golden ticket to America. Miserably stranded in a dank New York apartment, Ana conspires to leave. That is, until Juan’s younger brother, Cesar, convinces her there are reasons to stay.

Barter Books – a magical destination for book lovers

Barter Books is a charming (quite huge!) second hand bookshop in Alnwick, Northumberland, England. It’s unique in that it is situated inside a disused railway station - complete with original fixtures and fittings that look wonderfully old fashioned and retro while surrounded by shelves upon shelves of pre-loved books.  Thanks to Lauren & Luke Gibson… Continue reading Barter Books – a magical destination for book lovers

Review: On Earth We’re Briefly Gorgeous

On Earth We’re Briefly Gorgeous by Ocean Vuong is a breathtaking novel - short, but unendingly impactful. Vuong doesn’t waste a single word. He turns every line into something poetic and, in doing so, creates a unique and unforgettable piece of fiction.  What’s it about? The speaker, Little Dog, is writing a long letter to… Continue reading Review: On Earth We’re Briefly Gorgeous

Review: Ghosts by Dolly Alderton

From the author of Everything I Know About Love and the presenter of the wildly popular podcast The High Low, comes Ghosts - a story about love, relationships and the growing pains of entering ‘real’ adulthood. The ‘single-girl’ in London narrative is nothing new, but Dolly Alderton’s debut novel is refreshingly honest, immediately relatable and thoroughly heart felt.